Lab Notes: Augmented Reality with the Microsoft HoloLens

Lab Notes: Augmented Reality with the Microsoft HoloLens

While wearable technology usually calls to mind devices such as smartwatches and fitness trackers, one exciting new avenue of research is augmented reality glasses. Virtual reality (VR) takes the user to a whole new virtual space, but augmented reality (AR) instead aims to enhance the real world by providing software interactions with physical things, through mediums like phone screens or glasses. This allows for a whole new approach to user interfaces, because programs can now interface with the real world in more meaningful capacities.

Exploring the HoloLens’ Content Lock Options

Exploring the HoloLens’ Content Lock Options

As with any augmented reality device, the HoloLens has the ability to overlay content on the physical world. The content can take on a number of different forms such as simple 2D gauges or complex 3D models. No matter what the content type is, it has to be positioned somewhere in the physical world. This is where content locking comes in. We have put together an example of each type of content lock option that is available for the HoloLens along with a few notes on each.